Geography

‘Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. Geography is a great adventure with a purpose. So many of the world’s current problems boil down to geography, and we need the geographers of the future to help us understand them.’

Michael Palin

In today’s rapidly changing world, geography enables students to engage with current affairs, helping them to build an understanding about the processes that have shaped our planet. Global warming as it affects countries and regions, food and energy security, the degradation of land and soils from over-use and misuse, the spread of disease, the causes and consequences of migration, and the impacts of economic change on places and communities. These are just some of the challenges facing the next generation, which geographers must help solve and through its study, geography can foster an enjoyment and passion for such key topics.


Facilities and Accommodation

Geography is predominantly in one subject specific classroom and has access to a suite of laptops for frequent independent learning activities that utilises ICT. It integrates the opportunity to utilise the latest technology such as GIS eg. Google Earth. There are also opportunities to complete practical work outside of the classroom and learn by active investigation through fieldwork.

KS3 Curriculum

In Year 7 students study Geography for 10 weeks of the year with 6 hours of lessons a week on a rotation with other humanities subjects as part of the 7Up curriculum.

They will study:

  • Amazing Africa
  • Local areas and local fieldwork
  • Map skills
  • Global development and fair trade
  • Weather and climate

In Year 8 students study Geography on a rotation with other humanities subjects, there are 4 hours of humanities lessons a week.

There are 2 topics we study:

  1. Comparing countries – Students will study Nepal, Brazil and Japan in-depth to compare the human and physical differences between these 3 fascinating countries. They will also study megacities of today and understand their growth, development and future sustainability.
  2. Hazards – Students will study a range of natural hazards including tectonic hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis and meteorological hazards such as flooding, droughts and hurricanes. This enables plenty of opportunity to link their learning to current and topical real world events

In Year 9 students have one lesson of Geography a week throughout the year.

  • World Biomes
  • Global futures; including climate change and world epidemics
  • Tourism
  • Rivers

KS4 Curriculum

Exam board: Edexcel B

GCSE Geography comprises of 3 Units

Unit 1: Global Geographical Issues – Written examination: 1 hour and 30 minutes

  • Topic 1: Hazardous Earth
  • Topic 2: Development dynamics
  • Topic 3: Challenges of an urbanising world

Unit 2: UK Geographical Issues – Written examination: 1 hour and 30 minutes

  • Topic 4: The UK’s evolving physical landscape – including Coastal change and conflict and River processes and pressures.
  • Topic 5: The UK’s evolving human landscape –Dynamic UK cities.
  • Topic 6: Geographical investigations – including a physical rivers fieldwork investigation to Carding Mill Valley and a human fieldwork investigation to Birmingham.

Unit 3: People and Environment Issues – Making Geographical Decisions– Written examination: 1 hour and 30 minutes

  • Topic 7: People and the biosphere
  • Topic 8: Forests under threat
  • Topic 9: Consuming energy resources

All units are assessed by exam at the end of Year 11.

KS5 Curriculum

Please click here for details

Homework

Homework is set regularly and there is an expectation that it is completed on time and to a high standard. It involves a range of activities such as researching a recent topical geographical event or answering practice exam questions.

Extra-curricular activities

Geography provides a number of enrichment opportunities through fieldtrips and fieldwork in the school grounds. For example, Year 7 complete a study into their local area based on fieldwork in the surrounding area. Year 10 spend a day conducting human fieldwork in Birmingham and physical rivers fieldwork to Carding Mill Valley to support their geographical investigations component of Paper 2. Year 12 visit the coast for coastal fieldwork and they consider coastal landscape systems, processes and change and how coastal towns have been regenerated.  They also make visits to the University of Birmingham for master classes on climate change and to support their geographical investigation.